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Whey Protein and the Immune System

 

Effects of bovine colostrum supplementation on immune variables in highly trained cyclists.
Shing CM, et al. (2007)

 

Concentrated bovine colostrum protein supplementation reduces the incidence of self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in adult males.
Brinkworth GD, Buckley JD. (2003)

 

Effects of bovine colostrum supplementation on immune variables in highly trained cyclists.

 

Journal: J Appl Physiol. 2007 Mar;102(3):1113-22. Epub 2006 Nov 9.

 

Authors: Shing CM, Peake J, Suzuki K, Okutsu M, Pereira R, Stevenson L, Jenkins DG, Coombes JS.

 

School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia 4072. cshing@hms.uq.edu.au

 

Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of low-dose bovine colostrum protein concentrate (CPC) supplementation on selected immune variables in cyclists. Twenty-nine highly trained male road cyclists completed an initial 40-km time trial (TT(40)) and were then randomly assigned to either a supplement (n = 14, 10 g bovine CPC/day) or placebo group (n = 15, 10 g whey protein concentrate/day). After 5 wk of supplementation, the cyclists completed a second TT(40). They then completed 5 consecutive days of high-intensity training (HIT) that included a TT(40), followed by a final TT(40) in the following week. Venous blood and saliva samples were collected immediately before and after each TT(40), and upper respiratory illness symptoms were recorded over the experimental period. Compared with the placebo group, bovine CPC supplementation significantly increased preexercise serum soluble TNF receptor 1 during the HIT period (bovine CPC = 882 +/- 233 pg/ml, placebo = 468 +/- 139 pg/ml; P = 0.039). Supplementation also suppressed the postexercise decrease in cytotoxic/suppressor T cells during the HIT period (bovine CPC = -1.0 +/- 2.7%, placebo = -9.2 +/- 2.8%; P = 0.017) and during the following week (bovine CPC = 1.4 +/- 2.9%, placebo = -8.2 +/- 2.8%; P = 0.004). Bovine CPC supplementation prevented a postexercise decrease in serum IgG(2) concentration at the end of the HIT period (bovine CPC = 4.8 +/- 6.8%, P = 0.88; placebo = -9.7 +/- 6.9%, P = 0.013). There was a trend toward reduced incidence of upper respiratory illness symptoms in the bovine CPC group (P = 0.055). In summary, low-dose bovine CPC supplementation modulates immune parameters during normal training and after an acute period of intense exercise, which may have contributed to the trend toward reduced upper respiratory illness in the bovine CPC group.

 
   

Concentrated bovine colostrum protein supplementation reduces the incidence of self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in adult males.

 

Journal: Eur J Nutr. 2003 Aug;42(4):228-32.

 

Authors: Brinkworth GD, Buckley JD.

 

Centre for Research in Education and Sports Science Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Holbrooks Road, Underdale, South Australia 5032, Australia.

 

Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Anecdotal reports suggest that bovine colostrum may prevent upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). There is scant evidence to support such claims, although salivary IgA protects against URTI, and it was recently shown that bovine colostrum increases salivary IgA.
AIM OF THE STUDY: The present invesigation examined whether concentrated bovine colostrum protein (CBC) affected the incidence or duration of self-reported symptoms of URTI in adult males. METHODS: We examined logbooks containing self-reported symptoms of illness from previous studies which examined physiological effects of CBC. In these double-blind, placebo controlled studies, subjects had been randomly allocated to consume 60g. day(-1) of CBC (n = 93) or whey protein (WP) (n = 81) for eight weeks. Symptoms were coded using established criteria to identify those related to URTI. Since the incubation period for an URTI is up to five days, symptoms reported during the first week of supplementation (PRE-EXP) were analysed separately to preclude those arising from infection prior to study commencement.
RESULTS: During PRE-EXP, there was no difference in the proportion of subjects taking the different supplements who reported symptoms of URTI (CBC, 11%,WP, 5%; 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) -14% to 2%; P = 0.16). During the subsequent seven weeks (i. e. the experimental period), a significantly lesser proportion of subjects taking CBC reported symptoms of URTI compared with those taking WP (CBC, 32%,WP, 48%, P = 0.03; 95 % CI -30 % to -2 %), but symptom duration did not differ (CBC, 6.8 +/- 4.2 days,WP, 6.0 +/- 4.4 days; P = 0.27). CONCLUSION: This study provides preliminary evidence that CBC may enhance resistance to the development of symptoms of URTI.